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⠀ Old Lighthouse in Cabo San Pablo, Tierra del Fuego
⠀ The day we visited the Desdemona Shipwreck you can find a few photos ago in my feed, we first did a small hike up the hill of Cabo San Pablo to witness an amazing view of the Atlantic Ocean.
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After seeing a Condor flying over us and stumbling upon a Guanaco that was roaming the area we reached the top, where you can find this Old Lighthouse.
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After having a couple of snacks while our guides from @tierraturismo and @canal_fun shared some cool information about the area, we took a little bit of time to enjoy the view of the Desdemona from the top and to play around this old lighthouse. ⠀
It was built around 1940, but just a couple of years after that an earthquake left it in the position you can see in the photo. A new one was built with the proper corrections to avoid this would happen again, but this one remained and has become a well-known landmark. ⠀ Soon after, though, it started raining a little bit and we maded our way back to those cool Land Rovers we rode around the Island. Maybe Nature sensed our hunger, since it rained for only 20 minutes after, and stopped as soon as we reached the lunch spot close to the ship.
The day we visited the Desdemona Shipwreck you can find a few photos ago in my feed, we first did a small hike up the hill of Cabo San Pablo to witness an amazing view of the Atlantic Ocean.
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After seeing a Condor flying over us and stumbling upon a Guanaco that was roaming the area we reached the top, where you can find this Old Lighthouse.
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After having a couple of snacks while our guides from TieRRa Turismo and Canal Fun shared some cool information about the area, we took a little bit of time to enjoy the view of the Desdemona from the top and to play around this old lighthouse.

It was built around 1940, but just a couple of years after that an earthquake left it in the position you can see in the photo. A new one was built with the proper corrections to avoid this would happen again, but this one remained and has become a well-known landmark.

Soon after, though, it started raining a little bit and we maded our way back to those cool Land Rovers we rode around the Island. Maybe Nature sensed our hunger, since it rained for only 20 minutes after, and stopped as soon as we reached the lunch spot close to the ship.

Photo taken at: Cabo San Pablo

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⠀ Ashy-headed Geese flying over A colony of King Penguins in Tierra del Fuego
⠀ During #AdventureWeekTDF we were pretty lucky to see penguins not just once, but twice: first the Gentoos on our first day in Argentina, and then the Kings by the end of the trip in Chile.
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On our way to Porvenir to board our charter back to Punta Arenas, we stopped along the way in @parquepinguinorey to learn a little bit more about these fellas.
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The park began after 2010 when a group of close to 100 of these guys arrived to the place. People were very curious and pretty much harassed them, so a local family who owns the property took the initiative to protect the 8 penguins that did stay and educate visitors to further the conservation project. ⠀
To avoid being intrusive, we watch them from afar behind a wooden wall built to limit the area according to the best conservation practices and using binoculars, but that’s more than enough to feel the connection with them. You can hear their cries, and they have a very particular one. At first I thought there was a drone in the area, but then I realized it was them. As they got close to the young ones that look up and make that funny sound. ⠀ Praises to the family, team of scientists, and volunteers who take on the task of caring for this beautiful birds!

During #AdventureWeekTDF we were pretty lucky to see penguins not just once, but twice: first the Gentoos on our first day in Argentina, and then the Kings by the end of the trip in Chile.
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On our way to Porvenir to board our charter back to Punta Arenas, we stopped along the way in @parquepinguinorey to learn a little bit more about these fellas.
⠀
The park began after 2010 when a group of close to 100 of these guys arrived to the place. People were very curious and pretty much harassed them, so a local family who owns the property took the initiative to protect the 8 penguins that did stay and educate visitors to further the conservation project.

To avoid being intrusive, we watch them from afar behind a wooden wall built to limit the area according to the best conservation practices and using binoculars, but that’s more than enough to feel the connection with them. You can hear their cries, and they have a very particular one. At first I thought there was a drone in the area, but then I realized it was them. As they got close to the young ones that look up and make that funny sound.

Praises to the family, team of scientists, and volunteers who take on the task of caring for this beautiful birds!

Photo taken at: Parque Pingüino Rey

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⠀ The Solo de Zaldivar Family, Pioneers of Patagonia
⠀ Estancia Río de los Ciervos (@riodelosciervos) was built almost a century ago and has been home for the Solo de Zaldivar Montes family ever since. It originally belonged to Arturo Solo de Zaldivar Montes, born and raised in Punta Arenas, who was a pioneer in the development of the region in many aspects.
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Three generations later, led by Alejandro, one of the coolest, kindest men you’ll meet, the family has opened the doors of this beautiful family property to visitors who wish to stay in their family home, learn about local history and pioneers, learn how to prepare and enjoy their home recipes, explore the beautiful property and so much more.
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When you have the chance to visit them, ask Alejandro for a tour of the house. He will gladly do so and will tell you the most amazing stories while showing you the family photos, the weapons hall, the framed newspapers and other amazing places in his property.

Estancia Río de los Ciervos (@riodelosciervos) was built almost a century ago and has been home for the Solo de Zaldivar Montes family ever since. It originally belonged to Arturo Solo de Zaldivar Montes, born and raised in Punta Arenas, who was a pioneer in the development of the region in many aspects.

Three generations later, led by Alejandro, one of the coolest, kindest men you’ll meet, the family has opened the doors of this beautiful family property to visitors who wish to stay in their family home, learn about local history and pioneers, learn how to prepare and enjoy their home recipes, explore the beautiful property and so much more.

When you have the chance to visit them, ask Alejandro for a tour of the house. He will gladly do so and will tell you the most amazing stories while showing you the family photos, the weapons hall, the framed newspapers and other amazing places in his property.

Photo taken at: Estancia Río de los Ciervos

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⠀ Helicopter Ride to the top of Ushuaia
⠀ One of the things many of us at #AdventureWeekTDF were looking forward to was the helicopter ride over Ushuaia, but due to the changing weather it almost got cancelled. Fortunately we were able to do it on our last day in the Argentinian side of Tierra del Fuego.
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We were split into three groups to fit us all into three 4 people (pilot included) helicopters. I was assigned to the last one.
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While I was excited to have my first helicopter ride, I’m normally not super stoked about riding motor vehicles as compared to being the one walking or climbing, but when the first group came back I noticed a very peculiar smile on their faces. Then the second group came back, same enigmatic smiles, and they started talking excitedly about the experience with the first group. That’s when I heard them mention landing on the top of a snowy mountain. -“Wow, I thought it was just a helicopter ride. Can it really be that impressive?” -I said softly to myself. ⠀
Well, it definitely was! The feeling of riding a helicopter is way cooler than I thought all by itself, but the views you see of Ushuaia as you ride over its waterfront and city, and as you go around Mt. Olivia and see the 5 Brothers being revealed behind it, and then going between them to land on top of Cerro Le Cloché! Dude! That’s where that smile came from. ⠀ As we got off the helicopter, I saw the smile appearing in my ride buddies, and when the other two choppers landed I saw that same inevitable smile on everyone else. Then to top it all, the pilots came to us with a glass of champagne to toast to an amazing ride. ⠀ After overloading our senses with the views of Olivia, 5 Brothers and Ushuaia, we took a few photos to make sure we would not forget an unforgettable experience, hopped onto our seats and enjoyed a thrilling, roller-coaster like drop down the hill to reunite with the still excited group at ground level and celebrate the experience. ⠀ Thanks so much for that ride, @heliushuaia. You definitely got a great experience there.

One of the things many of us at #AdventureWeekTDF were looking forward to was the helicopter ride over Ushuaia, but due to the changing weather it almost got cancelled. Fortunately we were able to do it on our last day in the Argentinian side of Tierra del Fuego.

We were split into three groups to fit us all into three 4 people (pilot included) helicopters. I was assigned to the last one.

While I was excited to have my first helicopter ride, I’m normally not super stoked about riding motor vehicles as compared to being the one walking or climbing, but when the first group came back I noticed a very peculiar smile on their faces. Then the second group came back, same enigmatic smiles, and they started talking excitedly about the experience with the first group. That’s when I heard them mention landing on the top of a snowy mountain. -“Wow, I thought it was just a helicopter ride. Can it really be that impressive?” -I said softly to myself.

Well, it definitely was! The feeling of riding a helicopter is way cooler than I thought all by itself, but the views you see of Ushuaia as you ride over its waterfront and city, and as you go around Mt. Olivia and see the 5 Brothers being revealed behind it, and then going between them to land on top of Cerro Le’Cloché! Dude! That’s where that smile came from.

As we got off the helicopter, I saw the smile appearing in my ride buddies, and when the other two choppers landed I saw that same inevitable smile on everyone else. Then to top it all, the pilots came to us with a glass of champagne to toast to an amazing ride.

After overloading our senses with the views of Olivia, 5 Brothers and Ushuaia, we took a few photos to make sure we would not forget an unforgettable experience, hopped onto our seats and enjoyed a thrilling, roller-coaster like drop down the hill to reunite with the still excited group at ground level and celebrate the experience.

Thanks so much for that ride, Heliushuaia. You definitely got a great experience there.

Photo taken at: Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

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⠀ Waking up to the Luis de Saboya Glacier
⠀ Hey, everyone! I got lost for a couple of days, one being in transit back home, and one more in which I blacked out, sleeping for about 24 hours, haha, but I’m ready to continue sharing some more photos from Tierra del Fuego!
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After we kayaked with those humpbacks we sailed all night through the Trait of Magellan to get closer to the spot where we would meet the rest of group. We got up early morning while it was still dark to prepare all our stuff to jump off the Expedición Fitz Roy boat once we reached Caleta María.
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As we were finishing with breakfast, the light of day started creeping in, revealing the beautiful landscapes of the Darwin range we were sailing by. It didn’t take long for the massive Luis de Saboya glacier to appear behind a mountain, and all of us rushed out to enjoy the amazing view. ⠀
Once energized with the chilly wind and awesome view of the glacier, we were ready to take on another day of #AdventureWeekTDF and made our way back to land in Tierra del Fuego. Not at all a bad way to wake up for adventure!

Hey, everyone! I got lost for a couple of days, one being in transit back home, and one more in which I blacked out, sleeping for about 24 hours, haha, but I’m ready to continue sharing some more photos from Tierra del Fuego!

After we kayaked with those humpbacks we sailed all night through the Strait of Magellan to get closer to the spot where we would meet the rest of group. We got up early morning while it was still dark to prepare all our stuff to jump off the Expedición Fitz Roy boat once we reached Caleta María.

As we were finishing with breakfast, the light of day started creeping in, revealing the beautiful landscapes of the Darwin range we were sailing by. It didn’t take long for the massive Luis de Saboya glacier to appear behind a mountain, and all of us rushed out to enjoy the amazing view.

Once energized with the chilly wind and awesome view of the glacier, we were ready to take on another day of #AdventureWeekTDF and made our way back to land in Tierra del Fuego. Not at all a bad way to wake up for adventure!

Photo taken at: Cerro Luis de Saboya

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⠀ Kayaking with humpback whales in the Strait of Magellan
⠀ Having grown up in Los Cabos, I’m no stranger to whales. I saw them for the first time when I arrived there at the age of 9, driving with my mom and some friends to a lookout point where we could see them from afar while having a picnic. Then on a boat, where a calf put out such a great show, breaching over and over again right next to us, even splashing us. Then a couple of years ago I had a gray whale at petting distance in San Ignacio Lagoon in the North side of Baja California Sur.
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Sometime later I had the pleasure of watching them breach in Costa Rica and then in Alaska. It was like finding family by chance in another country.
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But enough of bragging rights. The point is, while I’d repeat any of those again, it’s going to be hard to top kayaking next to three humpbacks in the Strait of Magellan. That is such a personal connection with this gentle giants I love, and it was amazing to do it with a group of people that appreciated them as I do. ⠀
Praise well deserved to @kayakaguafresca and Expedición Fitz Roy for such an amazing tour. This was definitely one of the highlights of #AdventureWeekTDF.
Having grown up in Los Cabos, I’m no stranger to whales. I saw them for the first time when I arrived there at the age of 9, driving with my mom and some friends to a lookout point where we could see them from afar while having a picnic. Then on a boat, where a calf put out such a great show, breaching over and over again right next to us, even splashing us. Then a couple of years ago I had a gray whale at petting distance in San Ignacio Lagoon in the North side of Baja California Sur.

Sometime later I had the pleasure of watching them breach in Costa Rica and then in Alaska. It was like finding family by chance in another country.

But enough of bragging rights. The point is, while I’d repeat any of those again, it’s going to be hard to top kayaking next to three humpbacks in the Strait of Magellan. That is such a personal connection with this gentle giants I love, and it was amazing to do it with a group of people that appreciated them as I do.

Praise well deserved to Kayak Agua Fresca and Expedición Fitz Roy for such an amazing tour. This was definitely one of the highlights of AdventureWeek Tierra del Fuego.

Photo taken at: Strait of Magellan

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⠀ Fuerte Bulnes: A National Monument of Chile
⠀ Before the city of Punta Arenas existed, in their colonisation efforts of this region Chile built a fort a little bit to the South of this famous Sandy Point. It stood there for some time, giving the country control over the Strait of Magellan, but was eventually left behind when Punta Arenas was established.
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It was in ruins for a long time, and even set on fire during a mutiny, but given its importance in the establishment of Chile in the region, for its 100 years anniversary it was rebuilt as a replica, and eventually declared a National Monument.
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The place is amazing and very well conserved. Walking through it’s huts and chapel, and by its walls and cannons, it’s very easy to imagine what life was like in there, and to satisfy the adventurer’s heart even more, apart from the passionate history lesson you can get from your guide, there’s also a few trails along the coast and through the forest that are pretty cool to explore, and on the way to the fort you can also find another really awesome museum about the history of the Strait of Magellan. ⠀
I highly recommend visiting early in the morning, and definitely don’t forget your camera. The beautiful light of the sunrise really adds an amazing aura to the place that will make you fall in love with its stories.

Before the city of Punta Arenas existed, in their colonisation efforts of this region Chile built a fort a little bit to the South of this famous Sandy Point. It stood there for some time, giving the country control over the Strait of Magellan, but was eventually left behind when Punta Arenas was established.

It was in ruins for a long time, and even set on fire during a mutiny, but given its importance in the establishment of Chile in the region, for its 100 years anniversary it was rebuilt as a replica, and eventually declared a National Monument.

The place is amazing and very well conserved. Walking through it’s huts and chapel, and by its walls and cannons, it’s very easy to imagine what life was like in there, and to satisfy the adventurer’s heart even more, apart from the passionate history lesson you can get from your guide, there’s also a few trails along the coast and through the forest that are pretty cool to explore, and on the way to the fort you can also find another really awesome museum about the history of the Strait of Magellan.

I highly recommend visiting early in the morning, and definitely don’t forget your camera. The beautiful light of the sunrise really adds an amazing aura to the place that will make you fall in love with its stories.

Photo taken at: Fuerte Bulnes

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⠀ Gaucho on the way to Porvenir, Tierra del Fuego
⠀ Alright! We’re just back to Punta Arenas after exploring the Chilean side of #AdventureWeekTDF, and I must say it was amazing! I wish I could have shared those moments day by day as we were experiencing them, but one of the highlights of this part of Tierra del Fuego is that it’s still pretty wild, so no wifi, no cell phone signal, no instagram! I’ll be sharing them on the next few days, and there’s also some moments from Argentina that I want to share with you, but first let us show some love to our host for the last couple of days, @patagoniacl.
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Chilean Tierra del Fuego is all about disconnecting from modern life and immersing yourself in this wild, untamed place. In this following series, you’ll see our visit to a fort from mid 1800s, our adventure on a really cool expedition boat through the Strait of Magellan that includes kayaking with humpback whales and the visit to a massive glacier, and a little bit of wildlife, so don’t forget to follow so you don’t miss one of them.
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We’ll start small for now, though, with one of my favourite things about the place. Given it is so untamed, highlights can be up to a couple of hours apart from each other, so you’ll have some driving ahead of you. While this may sound a bit off-putting for some, the scenery and moments you’ll find along the way will keep you your adventurer’s heart at ease.
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One of these common sights are Gauchos, local sheep-herders that are well known part of the Patagonian culture, always surrounded by their loyal pack of dogs that helps them keep the sheep in line. ⠀
Mix their strong presence, a few snowy peaks in the background and the never-ending, beautiful cloud-diffused light of Tierra del Fuego and you’ll get a captivating scene that unfolds before you and mesmerizes you with the Patagonian way of life.

Alright! We’re just back to Punta Arenas after exploring the Chilean side of AdventureWeek Tierra del Fuego, and I must say it was amazing! I wish I could have shared those moments day by day as we were experiencing them, but one of the highlights of this part of Tierra del Fuego is that it’s still pretty wild, so no wifi, no cell phone signal, no instagram! I’ll be sharing them on the next few days, and there’s also some moments from Argentina that I want to share with you, but first let us show some love to our host for the last couple of days, Patagonia Chile.

Chilean Tierra del Fuego is all about disconnecting from modern life and immersing yourself in this wild, untamed place. In this following series, you’ll see our visit to a fort from mid 1800s, our adventure on a really cool expedition boat through the Strait of Magellan that includes kayaking with humpback whales and the visit to a massive glacier, and a little bit of wildlife, so don’t forget to follow so you don’t miss one of them.

We’ll start small for now, though, with one of my favourite things about the place. Given it is so untamed, highlights can be up to a couple of hours apart from each other, so you’ll have some driving ahead of you. While this may sound a bit off-putting for some, the scenery and moments you’ll find along the way will keep you your adventurer’s heart at ease.

One of these common sights are Gauchos, local sheep-herders that are well known part of the Patagonian culture, always surrounded by their loyal pack of dogs that helps them keep the sheep in line.

Mix their strong presence, a few snowy peaks in the background and the never-ending, beautiful cloud-diffused light of Tierra del Fuego and you’ll get a captivating scene that unfolds before you and mesmerizes you with the Patagonian way of life.

Photo taken at: Tierra del Fuego Province, Chile

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⠀ Snowshoeing in Tierra Mayor with Antartur Adventure
⠀ Tierra Mayor is a huge valley very close to Ushuaia that is well known for its winter activities such as dogsledding, cross-skiing, trekking, snowmobiling, ice-climbing, and more.
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We went there for snowshoeing in a really cool experience put together by Antartur Adventure aptly called Snow & Fire. We first arrived in the evening to the Tierra Mayor shelter, where we learned a little bit about the history of the place from the owners while enjoying their delicious chocolate. We then proceeded to get our snowshoes fitted, picked up some lamps and headed out into the night.
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After a short hike we entered the forest and followed a road with torches until we arrived to an awesome cone-shaped hut, as they were traditionally built by the native people. Inside, they were waiting for us with some delicious skewers to snack on, hot wine, mountain coffee and live guitar music. We had a great time in there enjoying all the favours our hosts prepared and sharing a cool moment as a group.
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Unfortunately time runs out and we had to head out of that magical place after a while, but to make up for that we snowshoed our way to the Nunatak shelter, where we ended the night with more food, wine and good conversation. ⠀
I think these are the days that help people bond together and create lasting memories. Thanks, Tierra del Fuego, for your infinite supply of magic.

Tierra Mayor is a huge valley very close to Ushuaia that is well known for its winter activities such as dogsledding, cross-skiing, trekking, snowmobiling, ice-climbing, and more.

We went there for snowshoeing in a really cool experience put together by Antartur Adventure aptly called Snow & Fire.

We first arrived in the evening to the Tierra Mayor shelter, where we learned a little bit about the history of the place from the owners while enjoying their delicious chocolate. We then proceeded to get our snowshoes fitted, picked up some lamps and headed out into the night.

After a short hike we entered the forest and followed a road with torches until we arrived to an awesome cone-shaped hut, as they were traditionally built by the native people. Inside, they were waiting for us with some delicious skewers to snack on, hot wine, mountain coffee and live guitar music. We had a great time in there enjoying all the favours our hosts prepared and sharing a cool moment as a group.

Unfortunately time runs out and we had to head out of that magical place after a while, but to make up for that we snowshoed our way to the Nunatak shelter, where we ended the night with more food, wine and good conversation.

I think these are the days that help people bond together and create lasting memories. Thanks, Tierra del Fuego, for your infinite supply of magic.

Photo taken at: Valle Tierra Mayor Ushuaia

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Off-Roading Fagnano Circuit with @tierraturismo
⠀ So this was one of the really cool activities we did yesterday. We left Hosteria Kaikén (@hosteriakaiken) early in the morning to discover a completely different landscape than the one we drove by the day before. Our guides we’re excited to see all the snow that was covering the land, promising the interesting day they were hoping to share with us.
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Riding these Land Rovers over curvy hills, huge puddles of mud that got you shaking more than salsa dancing on a Saturday night, and beautiful views of Lake Fagnano felt like being in the coolest roller coaster in the world. We also found several downed trees along the way that “we” gladly and excitedly helped get out of the way (and I say “we” because I must admit I helped with one branch only, and abused my storytelling position the rest of the time by focusing on taking photos of the actual badass girls and boys who actually took care of this).
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We stopped at TieRRa’s shelter for a delicious barbecue and concluded this activity with the awesome snowball fight from last night’s photo.
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This trip just keeps getting better every day! I can’t wait to see what the rest of the days have in store for us!

So this was one of the really cool activities we did yesterday. We left Hosteria Kaikén early in the morning to discover a completely different landscape than the one we drove by the day before. Our guides we’re excited to see all the snow that was covering the land, promising the interesting day they were hoping to share with us.

Riding these Land Rovers over curvy hills, huge puddles of mud that got you shaking more than salsa dancing on a Saturday night, and beautiful views of Lake Fagnano felt like being in the coolest roller coaster in the world. We also found several downed trees along the way that “we” gladly and excitedly helped get out of the way (and I say “we” because I must admit I helped with one branch only, and abused my storytelling position the rest of the time by focusing on taking photos of the actual badass girls and boys who actually took care of this).

We stopped at tieRRa‘s shelter for a delicious barbecue and concluded this activity with the awesome snowball fight from last night’s photo.

This trip just keeps getting better every day! I can’t wait to see what the rest of the days have in store for us!

Photo taken at: Tierra del Fuego, Argentina

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